The Moorehead Family Humanity in Healthcare Act of Georgia.

https://petitions.whitehouse.gov/petition/encourage-georgia-house-representatives-enact-moorehead-family-humanity-healthcare-act-georgia/pGSWtMHs

^ Above is the petition of the month and below is The Bill itself.

Be it enacted by the people of the state of Georgia.

Section 1, Title:

Sections 1 through 15 of this chapter shall be known as: The Moorehead Family Humanity in Healthcare Act of Georgia.

Section 2, By Section Summations and Clarifications of Intent:

(1) The intent of “Section 2, By Section Summations and Clarifications of Intent:” is to provide for those who do not wish to read the entire bill’s contents a means to grasp a basic understanding.

(2) The intent of “Section 3, Reasoning:” is to provide reasoning and understanding behind the motivations of the bill. This bill has been written to reduce certain risks that are largely unnecessary these risks include the risks associated with Medical Professional’s not having crisis management or anger management training. This bill also is attempting to combat the often callous nature of Medical Professionals. This bill is also attempting to combat the often forgetful nature of humans, which as Medical Professionals are human, the often forgetful nature of Medical Professionals.

(3) The intent of “Section 4, Findings:” is to provide a scientifically literate and socially acceptable backing and justification to the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(4) The intent of “Section 5, Definitions:” is to provide definitions for the following words and concepts:

(4a) “Patient”: for the intent of this chapter is defined broadly to include as many people as possible, as to prevent claim that an individual is not a “Patient”.

(4b) “Health Care Provider”: for the intent of this chapter is defined broadly to include as many individuals, institutions or agencies which function in a manner that one would think of as providing health care, as to prevent claim that an individual, institution or agency is not a “Health Care Provider”.

(4c) “Medical Professional”: the intent in regard to the term “Medical Professional” very nearly match the intents in regard to “Health Care Provider”.

(4d) “Credentialed Religious Leader”: for the intent of this chapter is defined in attempt to express a need for a person of outstanding moral fiber and professionalism. This is done in effort to prevent claim by individual of lesser moral fiber or professionalism that they are a “Credentialed Religious Leader”.

(4e) The intent in regard to the term “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence” very nearly match the intent in regard to “Credentialed Religious Leader”.

(4f) “Hippocratic Style Oath”: for the intent of this chapter is defined to provide an oath that can function as reminder of character fortitude and function as a moral compass.

(4g) “Visible Symbol of American Patriotism”: for the intent of this chapter is defined to provide a means to guide the expression of respectful American Patriotism.

(4h) “Suitable Crisis Management Training”: is defined three ways A, B and C which for the intent of this chapter are all to be held equal to each other.

(4i) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”: is intended to provide a crisis management training option that can be done outside of a traditional classroom setting as to provide for those who would be more comfortable in such an environment. “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” is also intended to be monetarily free or very near free.

(4j) “Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”: is intended to provide a crisis management training renewal option for “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” it is also intended to be monetarily free or very near free.

(4k) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B”: is intended to provide a crisis management training option that can be done in a manner that is nearer to a traditional learning structure as to provide for those who would be more comfortable in such an environment. “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B” is also intended to allow for those who would feel more comfortable paying for and/or receiving paid training to do so. Programs that meet the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B” are permitted to be monetarily free, or reasonably priced and this would not go against the intents of the definition.

(4l) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C”: is intended to provide a crisis management training option that can be done in a religious environment as to provide for those who would be more comfortable in such an environment. There are no specific monetary intents and any monetary actions or respects with regard to providers of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C” is to be considered a reflection of the provider’s intents.

(4m) “Additional Crisis Management Training”: is intended to guide those who find themselves in need of additional assistance with crisis management training.

(4n) “Suitable Anger Management Training”: is defined three ways A, B and C which for the intent of this chapter are all to be held equal to each other.

(4o) The intent in regard to “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” very nearly match the intent in regard to “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”

(4p) The intent in regard to “Renewal of Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” very nearly match the intent in regard to “ Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”

(4q) The intent in regard to “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option B” very nearly match the intent in regard to “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B”

(4r) The intent in regard to “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C” very nearly match the intent in regard to “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C”

(4s) The intent in regard to “Additional Anger Management Training” very nearly match the intent in regard to “Additional Crisis Management Training”

(4t) “Terms To Be Met As A Portion Of The Definition Of: “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” And/ Or “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A”: is intended to provide a location for terms that are the same or similar with the two definitions, so to prevent unnecessary repetitiveness and save paper when the entire bill is printed out.

(4u) “Treatment Plan”: is defined in such a manner that the definition is intended to provide a guiding definition that is not overly restrictive, as to allow for the most effective treatments possible.

(5) The intent of “Section 6, Obligations of the Health Care Provider:” is to provide framework for how to manage the “Medical Professionals” under the “Health Care Provider” with regards to the intent, acts and purposes of this bill. This section also mandates that “Health Care Providers” show American Patriotism in such a manner that it is intended to be comforting and obvious.

(6) The intent of “Section 7, Punitive actions that may be taken against the Health Care Provider who fails to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter:”: is to allow for punitive actions against the healthcare provider who fails to follow the acts of this chapter. This section intends some specific actions outline in this sections, but also intends to allow for other actions not outlined in this section.

(7) The intent of “Section 8, Special rights of the Health Care Provider guaranteed by the acts of this chapter:” is to increase the capacity of Health Care Providers. This section also intends to allow Health Care Providers a basic framework for maintaining crisis management training and anger management training. This section intends to allow for problem behavior prevention and correction of problem behaviors of employees that exhibit such behavior, via allowing the health care provider to mandate employees seek additional or renewal of crisis management or anger management training.

(8) The intent of “Section 9, Obligations of the Medical Professional:” is to mandate that Medical Professionals, complete crisis management training and anger management training. Additionally this section intends to mandate that Medical Professionals, take a Hippocratic oath once a year. It is also the intent of this section to require that Medical Professionals show American Patriotism in such a manner that it is intended to be comforting and obvious.

(9) The intent of “Section 10, Obligations of Medical Professionals with regard to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training:” is that Medical Professionals, obtain and maintain CPR certification.

(10) The intent of “Section 11, Special Obligations of Medical Professionals with Patients Undergoing Treatments:” is to ensure that all Medical professionals, use Treatment Plans in much the same way that Oncologists do.

(11) The intent of “Section 12, Special Obligations of Medical Professionals Who Do Or May Have Direct Contact With Pregnant Patients:” is to mandate respect for and reduce the risk to pregnant women and their children.

(12) The intent in regard to “Section 13, Punitive actions that may be taken against the Medical Professional who fails to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter:” very nearly match the intents in regard to “Section 7, Punitive actions that may be taken against the Health Care Provider who fails to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter:”

(13) The intent of “Section 14, Addenda and appendixes:” is to provide content that is needed for other portions of the bill, including: two different Hippocratic oaths, a crisis management training program and an anger management training program.

Section 3. Reasoning:

This bill is about the building of trust in medicine, and reduction of risk. The medical field has always gathered attention, with every disaster how the medical care present preforms and responds is always made public. How many people die each year due to medical error? The New York Times reported 98,000 in 1999 modern reports put the number in excess of 200,000: the real number could be greatly in excess of this number; something must be done. The beautiful little girl that the Moorehead Family lost is not considered in the computation of this statistic, due to a technicality: an autopsy was refused thus a cause of death was not officiated, many people’s deaths are not considered in the computation of this statistic. The Center of Disease Control reported that 2.4 + million people died in the United States in 2009. How many of those people would not have died if Medical Professionals did a better job and reacted better in a crisis? How many of these accidental deaths due to medical error can be associated with anger, is unknown. Many of us have experienced medical error related to an uncaring nature of Medical Professionals. When a Medical Professional makes a mistake especially one that results in death, the mistake is irreversible. To prevent the deadly mistakes of tomorrow we must pay attention to and learn from the deadly mistakes of today. To reiterate and conclude: Lessons must be learned, risks must be reduced, and lives are worth saving.

Section 4, Findings:

(a) Walter Bradford Cannon M.D. first coined the term “Fight or Flight Response” his theories were popularized in his book “The Wisdom of the Body” first published in 1932. Since, his theories have been greatly expanded on and the basic tenements of “Fight or Flight Response” have become common knowledge.

(b) Most physiological responses that have been associated with fight or flight are dangerous for the Medical Professional to experience during the treatment of a patient. A list of physiological responses commonly associated with fight or flight include but are not limited to: Tunnel Vision (loss of peripheral vision), Auditory Exclusion (loss of hearing), Shaking, Irrational Behavior, and Acceleration of Heart and Lung Action.

(c) Girl Scouts of America (GSA) and Boy Scouts of America (BSA) are both commonly trained in crisis management. The United States Department of Homeland Security has partnered with the BSA to build upon the Ready Campaign. The goal of the Ready Campaign is to assist citizens nationwide to prepare for emergencies of all kinds. One of the many goals of the BSA and GSA is to have the will to be ready to serve in an emergency. The primary emphasis of the individual preparedness portion of the Emergency Preparedness BSA plan, as it is promoted by the Ready Campaign is: to train members to be mentally and emotionally prepared to act promptly.

(d) Johnson & Johnson showed the value of crisis management in 1986. The company had learned a few lessons from the cyanide poisoning of Tylenol products in 1982 which resulted in confirmed deaths of seven people. When nearly the same situation happened in 1986, Johnson & Johnson acted in a manner that is consistent with crisis management training and is commonly considered remarkably honorable and their actions were lifesaving. As part of an on-going response, Johnson & Johnson developed tamper-proof packaging which greatly decreased the chances of tainted medications. Tamper-proof packaging shows that crisis management does not stop after the incident is over and can continue to save lives after a crisis. Proper crisis management by Johnson & Johnson saved lives. Crisis management saves lives.

(e) Anger management programs are common for children, teens and adults of every socioeconomic background. Pediatricians are frequently consulted for help with anger management for children. Professional therapists, religious organizations, non-profits, support groups and structured anger management programs, exist to fit the needs of every demographic. Anger management programs can be court ordered or self-referred. Programs are commonly accessible. Professional therapists often work on sliding scales based on a patient’s income. Religious organizations and non-profits occasionally provide services free of charge, and structured anger management programs range in price: anger management is affordable.

(f) Society places a high value on Anger Management programs as evident by them frequently being court ordered. If a court orders an individual to attend anger management classes that individual is legally bound to attend, and could face legal consequences if they fail to comply.

(g) Hippocrates is often credited with being the father of medicine the oath that bears his name was first written after his death by an unknown author. There are several versions of the Hippocratic Oath, and some version is near universally taken by physicians upon graduation from medical school. The near uniformity in the taking of a Hippocratic Oath, shows that society at large and the medical community place value on the practice of taking a Hippocratic Oath.

(h) The Classical Version of the Hippocratic Oath as translated from Greek by Ludwig Edelstein, can be found in it’s entirety in addendum 1 of subsection 1 of section 14, this oath has functioned and been treated like a moral compass since ancient times.

(i) A Modern Version of the Hippocratic Oath as written by Louis Lasagna in 1964, can be found in it’s entirety in addendum 2 of subsection 2 of section 14, this version is used in many medical schools today and is currently regarded by many to have the functionality of a moral compass.

(j) Society has treated Crisis Management, Anger Management and The Hippocratic Oath as forms of preventative medicine.

(k) The medical community, as a sub-culture, should be accepting towards this bill because what this bill purposes is benevolent and should be considered a type of preventative medicine. According to the American College of Preventative Medicine: “Preventative Medicine is practiced by all physicians to keep their patients healthy.” The American College of Preventative Medicine promotes, among other things, accountability of healthcare organizations for improving the health of populations. Preventative medicine works. Early detection, and preventative techniques have been proven to save lives of countless cancer victims, and ease the suffering of those afflicted with other diseases and ailments. The medical community could save lives by treating Crisis Management Training, Anger Management Training, and Hippocratic Oaths as preventative medicine.

Section 5, Definitions:

For the purposes of “The Moorehead Family Humanity in Healthcare Act of Georgia” unless the context otherwise requires: “Chapter” means: “The Moorehead Family Humanity in Healthcare Act of Georgia” When the word “chapter” is used in the contents of “The Moorehead Family Humanity in Healthcare Act of Georgia” the word “chapter” is to be considered in/of equal weight to “The Moorehead Family Humanity in Healthcare Act of Georgia” and as such is a reference to the entire contents.

For purposes of this chapter, unless the context otherwise requires:

(a) “Patient” means:

(1) One who receives medical attention, care or treatment.

(2) One that is acted upon or undergoes an action in the interest of their physical and/or emotional well-being.

(3) One who is under healthcare, waiting for care, receiving care, or has already received care.

(4) One who is not currently under healthcare but is in need of care.

(5) One who is in an apparent compromised physical or emotional state.

(6) One who is in a compromised physical or emotional state, while the nature of their condition is seemingly imperceptible and/or unknown to themselves.

(7) One who is in a compromised physical or emotional state, while the nature of their condition is seemingly imperceptible and/or unknown to others of the general populace.

(8) One who is in a compromised physical or emotional state, while the nature of their condition is seemingly imperceptible and/or unknown to those providing healthcare or healing arts.

(b) “Health Care Provider” means:

(1) Any individual, institution, or agency that provides health services to health care consumers.

(2) Any individual, institution, or agency that is charged with the care of one or more individuals who fall under the definition of “Patient” as defined by this chapter.

(3) Any individual, institution, or agency through which their actions of a business nature or otherwise have a direct or indirect effect or affect on the care of one or more individuals who fall under the definition of “Patient” as defined by this chapter.

(4) Any individual, institution, or agency that collects monies for services that are labeled or marketed and/or could be described with any of the following terms: health, healthcare, health insurance, medicine, medical, medical care, medical insurance, healing, healing arts, homeopathic, spiritual healing, emotional healing, physical healing, physiological healing, mental healing, and psychological healing.

(5) Any individual, institution, or agency that provides services that are labeled or marketed and/or could be described with any of the following terms: health, healthcare, health insurance, medicine, medical, medical care, medical insurance, healing, healing arts, homeopathic, spiritual healing, emotional healing, physical healing, physiological healing, mental healing, and psychological healing. And these services are provided without the collection of monies and/or provided on a non-profit and/or volunteer basis and/or internships and/or those persons fulfilling academic requirements.

(6) For the purposes and acts of this chapter the term “Health Care Provider” shall be held to the above definitions and thus define the following list of individuals, institutions and agencies. The following list in not limited to the following listed but also includes any other individuals, institutions and agencies which fall under the above definitions of “Health Care Provider”:

(6a) Private and public hospitals, clinics and medical centers of all medical specialties and of general practice shall for the acts of this chapter be held to the definition “Health Care Provider.”

(6b) All private practices of all medical specialties and of general practice shall for the acts of this chapter be held to the definition of “Health Care Provider”.

(6c) All insurance companies and every individual actively in direction and/or under direction of said company, which offer any goods and/or services and/or business actions that are involved with one or more individuals, institutions or agencies which by and for the purposes of this chapter are defined as “Health Care Provider”, shall hereby also be defined as “Health Care Provider” and shall be equally held to the acts of this chapter as others defined as “Health Care Provider”.

(6d) All medical supply companies shall for the acts of this chapter be held to the definition of “Health Care Provider”.

(6e) All companies which provide, manufacture, or sell pharmaceuticals, medication, and/or any product that is to be used in a medical manner shall for the acts of this chapter be held to the definition of “Health Care Provider”.

(6f) Any individual, institution or agency which offers holistic healing and/or healing services marketed as natural or all natural.

(6g) Any individual, institution or agency serving people suffering or in recovery from substance abuse, mental health issues, spousal or other domestic violence. Including but not limited to facilities which could be described as: rehabilitation facilities, mental health institutions, half-way houses, and shelters of all varieties.

(6h) Any individual, institution or agency of a religious nature serving people in any manner that is medical in nature.

(6i) All specialty practices of all medical specialties shall for the acts of this chapter be held to the definition of “Health Care Provider”.

(c) “Medical Professional” means:

(1) Any individual who is defined as a “Health Care Provider” as “Health Care Provider” is defined by this chapter.

(2) Any individual under the direction or employ of an institution of an educational nature, and/or missionary nature, and/or charitable nature and/or otherwise which is defined as a “Health Care Provider” as “Health Care Provider” is defined by this chapter.

(3) Any individual under the direction or employ of an agency which is defined as a “Health Care Provider” as “Health Care Provider” is defined by this chapter.

(4) For the purposes and acts of this chapter the term “Medical Professional” shall be held to the above definitions and thus define the following list of individuals. The following list is not limited to the following listed but also includes any other individuals which fall under the above definitions of “Medical Professional”:

(4a) Any individual who has a medical degree of any kind, regardless of medical license status, or employment status, or current activities, or future plans, or intentions.

(4b) Any individual who has a certification of a medical nature, regardless of current certification status, or current activities, or future plans, or intentions.

(4c) Any individual who does or does not have a medical degree and/or certification but acts as support staff, and/or administrative staff, and/or business staff, and/or secretarial staff, and/or security staff, and/or call center staff, and/or sales representative staff for another individual, institution or agency which is defined as a “Health Care Provider” and/or “Medical Professional” as “Health Care Provider” and/or “Medical Professional” is defined by this chapter; Individuals of such description shall hereby be defined as “Medical Professional”.

(4d) The contents of the following statement in no way nullify and/or redefine and/or abbreviate “Medical professional” or “Health Care Provider”. This statement is an elaboration and supplemental of the definition “Medical Professional”: Any individual who markets or describes themselves or can be readily described by the individual’s clientele and/or Patients and/or customers as a Medical Professional using any of the following terms and does or does not expressly fit the definition of “Medical Professional” and/or “Health Care Provider”: Doctor, Physician, Nurse, Medical Laboratory Technician, Medical Technician, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, Counselor, Healer, Individual Who Works In Healthcare, Individual Who Works In Health Insurance, Nun/s Or Other Religious Staff Serving As Medical Staff, Volunteer/s Serving As Medical Staff.

(5) Any individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter and is visiting for less then thirty days time, to be counted from and including the date of entry into the State of Georgia and to include the next thirty days regardless of presence in the State of Georgia: Said individual shall hereby be defined as “Medical Professional” for the acts and purposes of this chapter. Said individual while they are visiting the State of Georgia is permitted the following allowance: Said individual, if no legalities hinder such actions, is allowed to work only under the direct supervision of a State of Georgia resident who is in compliance with the acts of this chapter. To be permitted said allowance, said individual must have a current certification in Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training which is in compliance with section 10 subsection 1 and section 10 subsection 2 of this chapter.

(6) Any individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter and is visiting for more then thirty days time, to be counted from and including the date of entry into the State of Georgia and to include the next thirty days regardless of presence in the State of Georgia: Said individual shall hereby be defined as “Medical Professional” for the acts of this chapter. Said individual while they are visiting the State of Georgia past thirty days must by the acts and for the purposes become fully compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(7) Any individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter and visits the State of Georgia more then once in a year, to be counted from and including the date of entry into the State of Georgia and to include until said date of the following calendar year the regardless of presence in the State of Georgia: Said individual shall hereby be defined as “Medical Professional” for the acts of this chapter. Said individual while they are visiting the State of Georgia past thirty days by and for the acts and purposes of this chapter must become fully compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(8) Any individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter and visits the State of Georgia shall only not be considered a “Medical Professional” by and for the acts and purposes of this chapter in the event that said individual’s visit is only of a recreational nature. In which case said individual while they are visiting the State of Georgia is permitted the following allowances: said individual is shall not be held to be compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter excepting this chapter’s section 10 subsection 1 and this chapter’s section 10 subsection 2, said individual must be compliant with said sections while in the State of Georgia. For the sake of example: an individual who could be defined as a “Medical Professional” visits the state of Georgia must be CPR certified.

(9) Any individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter and is traveling through or over the State of Georgia at a speed in excess of 5 miles per hour shall for the duration of said travel by and for the acts and purposes of this chapter not be considered a “Medical Professional” unless said individual should want to preform any activity during said travel that would define said individual as a “Medical Professional” in which case said individual must first become compliant with the acts of this chapter.

(10) Any individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter but is no longer a student in a field related to healthcare and/or in training in a field related to healthcare and/or employed for compensation in a field related to healthcare and/or no longer working in a volunteer position that is related to healthcare and/or no longer in any way active in the activity that defined said individual as a “Medical Professional” and has been in such a state for a period in excess of thirty days, for the sake of example: a retiree; for the term of said individual’s inactivity shall not be held to be in compliance with the acts and purposes of this chapter. To return to said activity or any activity that would define said individual as a “Medical Professional” said individual must first become compliant with the acts of this chapter.

(11) Any individual who will meet the definition of “Medical Professional” as defined by this chapter upon starting an activity, must before starting said activity be in compliance with the acts and purposes of this chapter; for the sake of example: a newly hired person.

(12) Any individual who preforms an act of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation for the duration of said act, for the acts and purposes of this chapter is not to be considered a “Medical Professional”.

(13) Any individual who preforms an act in response to a natural or man made emergency for the duration of said act, for the acts and purposes of this chapter is not to be considered a “Medical Professional”.

(d) “Credentialed Religious Leader” means:

(1) Any individual referred to as a leader of a religious order, and/or religious congregation, and/or church, and/or religious mass by the members of aforementioned groups, as long as the group is legally classified as a religious group.

(2) Catholic Deacons, Priests, Bishops and Cardinals recognized as such by the Vatican.

(3) Protestant leaders with title of Priest, and/or Pastor, and/or Reverend, and/or Deacon and other Christian individuals of great respect given official titles of honor.

(4) Rabbis recognized by the local Jewish Synagogues and Jewish individuals of great respect given official titles of honor.

(4) Imams recognized by the local Islamic Mosque and Islamic individuals of great respect given official titles of honor.

(5) A Buddhist leader of great respect given an official title of honor, if the title is recognized by the local Buddhist temple.

(6) A Hindu leader of great respect given an official title of honor, if the title is recognized be the local Hindu temple.

(7) Members of religious orders who have dedicated their lives to religion and thus live a remarkably different existence then others of the same religion for the sake of example: Monks and Nuns.

(e) “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence” means:

(1) Any individual who, in the past ten years, scores and/or receives marks on a standardized test for Intelligence Quotient, I.Q. Test, in such a manner that their score is better than 90 percent of those who took the same standardized test for Intelligence Quotient. The term “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence” is relative to the moment of time the test was taken.

(2) Any individual who, in the past ten years, scores and/or receives marks on the Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery (ASVAB) in such a manner that their score is better than 90 percent of those who took the ASVAB. The term “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence” is relative to the moment of time the test was taken.

(3) Any individual who, in the past ten years, scores and/or receives marks on a placement test for the purpose of college entrance, for the sake of example: SAT as produced by the College Board and ACT as produced by ACT, inc., in such a manner that their score is better than 90 percent of those who took said placement test. For the sake of example: other tests include GRE, MCAT and LSAT. The term “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence” is relative to the moment of time the test was taken.

(4) Any Individual who meets the definition of “Medical Professional” and meets the definition of “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence” by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter may not function as a “Person of Certifiable High Intelligence”.

(f) “Hippocratic Style Oath” means:

(1) The Classical Version of the Hippocratic Oath translated from Greek by Ludwig Edelstein, as it is detailed in Addendum 1 of sub-section 1 of section 14 of this chapter.

(2) The Modern Version of the Hippocratic Oath written by Louis Lasagna in 1964, as it is detailed in Addendum 2 of sub-section 2 of section 14 of this chapter.

(3) Any oath that two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders, as the term Credentialed Religious Leader is defined by the acts of this chapter, who have personally known the Medical Professional taking the oath for at least 1 year, have provided signed legal testimony to the contents of. The oath as the two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders provides signed legal testimony to must be at least 300 words in length but no more than 1000 words in length. The oath as the two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders provides signed legal testimony to, must be in the professional opinion of the Credentialed Religious Leader to have the functionality of a moral compass.

(4) Any version of a Hippocratic oath that is labeled and regarded as a version of a Hippocratic oath by a Medical School or Medical Society/Organization, which two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders, as the term Credentialed Religious Leader is defined by the acts of this chapter, have provided signed legal testimony to the contents of. The oath as the two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders provide signed legal testimony to, must be at least 300 words in length but no more than 1000 words in length. The oath as the two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders provide signed legal testimony to, must be in the professional opinion of the Credentialed Religious Leader to have the functionality of a moral compass.

(5) Any oath that two or more individuals who are a Person of Certifiable High Intelligence, as the term Person of Certifiable High Intelligence is defined by the acts of this chapter, who personally know the Medical Professional taking the oath for at least one year, have provided signed legal testimony to the contents of. The oath as the two or more Person/s of Certifiable High Intelligence provide signed legal testimony to, must be at least 300 words in length but no more than 1000 words in length. The oath as the two or more Person/s of Certifiable High Intelligence provides signed legal testimony to, must be in the professional opinion of the Person/s of Certifiable High Intelligence to have the functionality of a moral compass.

(6) Any version of a Hippocratic oath that is labeled and regarded as a version of a Hippocratic oath by a Medical School or Medical Society/Organization, which two or more Nobel Peace Prize Winner/s, have provided signed legal testimony to the contents of. The oath as the two or more Nobel Peace Prize Winner/s provide signed legal testimony to, must be at least 300 words in length but no more than 1000 words in length. The oath as the two or more Nobel Peace Prize Winner/s provide signed legal testimony to, must be in the professional opinion of the Nobel Peace Prize Winner/s to have the functionality of a moral compass.

(g) “Visible Symbol of American Patriotism” means:

(1) Any respectful display of the image of the American Flag. Be the display a patch, a pin, a sticker, an article of clothing, an actual American Flag or otherwise, the display must be respectful. The display must be kept neat and orderly, and must be shielded, protected and respected as if it were an American Flag. The display must be sizable enough to be clearly visible.

(2) Any respectful display of the image of any of the following phrases: America, American Pride, America The Beautiful, Stars and Stripes Forever, Support Our Troops, USA, United States of America, 4th of July, Fourth of July, July 4th, July Fourth, Proud To Be An American.

(3) Any display utilizing the colors and stylization of the American Flag, which has a positive message which two or more Credentialed Religious Leaders, as the term Credentialed Religious Leader is defined by the acts of this chapter, have provided signed legal testimony to the contents of. Any display utilizing the colors and stylization of the American Flag must not be bigoted, closed minded, or hateful towards any individual or group of peoples.

(4) Any display that respectfully identifies an individual as a Voter. If the individual is identifying themselves as a Voter, they must have voted within the last 5 years. If the individual is identifying themselves as a Voter, they must do so in such a manner that is politically neutral and in no way shows support of any political party.

(h) “Suitable Crisis Management Training” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training” as “Suitable Crisis Management Training” is defined by this chapter said individual shall be held to meet the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” or “Suitable Crisis Management Training Option – B” or “Suitable Crisis Management – Option C” these three definitions shall be held in equal regard, and may be used to meet the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training”.

(2) The completion of one of the aforementioned crisis management training programs for the acts and purposes of this chapter shall be considered to be equal in regard to completion of any and/or all of the aforementioned crisis management training programs.

(3) Said programs for the acts and purposes of this chapter are to be considered alternatives to one another, and the completion of one satisfies the any hold to complete one of the others.

(4) If an individual is requested to complete a specific crisis management training option which meets the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” or “Suitable Crisis Management Training Option – B” or “Suitable Crisis Management – Option C” the training option utilized is to be considered a personal choice and said individual choice is to be considered outside of the bindings of this chapter. However if the request is otherwise congruent with the acts and purposes of this chapter, one of crisis management training program options that meet the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training” must by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter be undertaken and completed: With respect to this “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” or “Suitable Crisis Management Training Option – B” or “Suitable Crisis Management – Option C” are all to be considered in equal regard. For the sake of example: an individual’s employer may request that they complete the training program at a local church to meet “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C”; But said individual feels uncomfortable at said establishment and would prefer instead to complete “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”: they are free to do so and can not be forced to go to said local church or complete “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C” for completing “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” is in equal regard.

(5) “Suitable Crisis Management Training” must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(i) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” as “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” is defined by this chapter one must write out in their own hand writing the exact entirety of addendum 3 of sub-section 3 of section 14 of this chapter. The contents of said document must be orally recited in the physical presence of an individual willing and able to provide legal testimony and said testimony must detail the document’s existence under threat of legal consequence for false testimony. All parties involved should receive a copy of said document.

(2) By the acts and for purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”:

(2a) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the handwritten document that is created by an individual for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection i of section 5 must be kept and protected by said individual.

(2b) The acts, purposes and definitions of subsection t of section 5 of this chapter, must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training”.

(j) “Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” means:

(1) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the handwritten document that is created by an individual for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection h of section 5 which must be kept and protected by said individual; May be used if the original is available to meet the definition of “Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”. The contents of said document must be orally recited in the physical presence of an individual willing and able to provide legal testimony and said testimony must detail the document’s existence under threat of legal consequence for false testimony.

(1a) If the original copy of said document is not available then the individual who is bound by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter to undertake “Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” must in place undertake “Suitable Crisis Management – Option A” notwithstanding subsection 1l of subsection 1 of subsection t of section 5 of this chapter.

(2) If any individual is held to obtain “Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” they may do so by meeting the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” and/or “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B” and/or “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C.” A repetition of the same crisis management training option that was undertaken in the past, is not necessary, and is not more or less valid.

(k) “Suitable Crisis Management Training Option – B” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B” as “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B” is defined by this chapter one must complete a course in Crisis Management which is worth Continuing Education Credits (CEC’s) and/or Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) and/or College Credits and/or College Units and obtain certification of said completion. Completion of said course may be done through whatever means said course allows for, but must be completed by the individual held to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B.” By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter the following terms and/or questions must be met and/or addressed for a Crisis Management course to be considered compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter:

(1a) The curriculum must teach in such a manner that a focus point of the curriculum is preparing for crisis situations, and practicing for crisis situations, there must be a stressing to gather as much information and materials before a crisis happens as is possible.

(1b) The curriculum must teach the creation and use of checklists.

(1c) The curriculum must teach communication techniques to be used in crisis situations.

(1d) The curriculum must teach a minimum of one example of how to respond to specific crisis situation that many people from all walks of life will be a victim of.

(1e) The curriculum must teach that a committed and compassionate investigation must begin immediately in the event that a crisis situation creates victims, especially if victims are due to error in crisis management; to help prevent a repetition of errors.

(2) By the acts and for purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B”:

(2a) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the physical proof of completion that is created for an individual who completes a Crisis Management course for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection h of section 5 must be kept and protected by said individual.

(2b) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option B” if it is held to be completed must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(l) “Suitable Crisis Management Training Option – C” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C” as “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C” is defined by this chapter one must complete a course in Crisis Management which is officially sanctioned and operated under the direct supervision of a legally recognized religious organization and obtain certification of said completion. Said course to be undertaken by an individual for the purpose of compliance with the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management – Option C” by the acts and for the purposes of this chapters is not held to be worth credits or units of any kind. Completion of said course may be done through whatever means said course allows for, but must be completed by the individual held to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C.” By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter the following terms and/or questions must be met and/or addressed for a Crisis Management course that is of a religious nature or that is being used to obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C” for said course to be considered compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter:

(1a) The curriculum must teach in such a manner that a focus point of the curriculum is preparing for crisis situations, and practicing for crisis situations, there must be a stressing to gather as much information and materials before a crisis happens as is possible.

(1b) The curriculum must teach the creation and use of checklists.

(1c) The curriculum must teach communication techniques to be used in crisis situations.

(1d) The curriculum must teach a minimum of one example of how to respond to specific crisis situation that many people from all walks of life will be a victim of.

(1e) The curriculum must teach that a committed and compassionate investigation must begin immediately in the event that a crisis situation creates victims, especially if victims are due to error in crisis management; to help prevent a repetition of errors.

(1d) The curriculum must not teach that one religion or religious teaching is superior in any way to any other specific religion/s and/or beliefs and/or the lack thereof religious faith, to do so shall with regards to this chapter completely nullify the curriculum. It is however permitted to teach that one specific religion or religious teaching is generically good as long doing so can be done in such a manner that other specific religion/s and/or beliefs and/or the lack thereof religious faith are not taught to be generically bad or inferior. The aforementioned statement is only with regards to the curriculum of said Crisis Management program, and does not interfere with other proceedings.

(1e) The curriculum must not teach religion based discrimination or discrimination of any kind to do so shall with regards to this chapter completely nullify the curriculum. The aforementioned statement is only with regards to the curriculum of said Crisis Management program, and does not interfere with other proceedings.

(2) By the acts and for purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C”:

(2a) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the physical proof of completion that is created for an individual who completes a Crisis Management course for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection l of section 5 must be kept and protected by said individual.

(2b) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option C” if it is held to be completed must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(m) “Additional Crisis Management Training” means:

(1) An individual who is held to obtain “Additional Crisis Management Training” must meet the following terms and conditions for it to be said that they have obtained “Additional Crisis Management Training”:

(1a) A minimum of 10 hours of billable time spent with a licensed psychologist. During which every detail of the orders, directions, and suggestions of said involved licensed psychologist by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter are to be explicitly followed and considered to be legally binding, unless said orders, directions, and suggestions are incongruous with the law.

(1b) Failing to follow every detail of the orders, directions, and suggestions of said involved licensed psychologist during aforementioned minimum of 10 hours of billable time results in none of the billable hours with said involved licensed psychologist to count as being compliant towards the acts of this chapter.

(1c) In this aforementioned instance an individual who is being held to obtain “Additional Crisis Management Training” must obtain a minimum of 10 hours of billable time with a different individual who is a licensed psychologist and for which said billable time is compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(2) Any and all governmental bodies of the State of Georgia, and/or The American Medical Association, and/or The American Psychological Association may supply and mandate additional requirements for an individual who is held to obtain “Additional Crisis Management Training”.

(n) “Suitable Anger Management Training” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training” as “Suitable Anger Management Training” is defined by this chapter said individual shall be held to meet the definition of “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” or “Suitable Anger Management Training Option – B” or “Suitable Anger Management – Option C” these three definitions shall be held in equal regard, and may be used to meet the definition of “Suitable Anger Management Training”.

(2) “Suitable Anger Management Training” must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(o) “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training” as “Suitable Anger Management Training” is defined by this chapter one must write out in their own hand writing the exact entirety of addendum 4 of sub-section 4 of section 14 of this chapter.

(2) By the acts and for purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A”:

(2a) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the handwritten document that is created by an individual for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection o of section 5 must be kept and protected by said individual.

(2b) The acts, purposes and definitions of subsection t of section 5 of this chapter, must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A”.

(p) “Renewal of Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” means:

(1) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the handwritten document that is created by an individual for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection o of section 5 which must be kept and protected by said individual; May be used if the original is available to meet the definition of “Renewal of Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A.” The contents of said document must be orally recited in the physical presence of an individual willing and able to provide legal testimony and said testimony must detail to the document’s existence under threat of legal consequence for false testimony. All parties involved must receive a copy of said document.

(1a) If the original copy of said document is not available then the individual who is bound by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter to undertake “Renewal of Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” must in place undertake “Suitable Anger Management – Option A” notwithstanding subsection 1l of subsection 1 of subsection t of section 5 of this chapter.

(q) “Suitable Anger Management Training Option – B” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option B” as “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option B” is defined by this chapter one must complete a course in Anger Management which is worth Continuing Education Credits (CEC’s) and/or Continuing Education Units (CEU’s) and/or College Credits and/or College Units and obtain certification of said completion. Said course to be undertaken by an individual for the purpose of compliance with the definition of “Suitable Anger Management – Option B” by the acts and for the purposes of this chapters, in the event that said Anger Management course is approved by the State of Georgia as a course which satisfies the requirements of court ordered anger management, said course is not held to be worth credits or units of any kind. Completion of said course may be done through whatever means said course allows for, but must be completed by the individual held to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option B.”

(2) By the acts and for purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option B”:

(2a) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the physical proof of completion that is created for an individual who completes a Crisis Management course for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection q of section 5 must be kept and protected by said individual.

(2b) “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option B” if it is held to be completed must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(r) “Suitable Anger Management Training Option – C” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter if an individual should be held to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C” as “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C” is defined by this chapter one must complete a course in Anger Management which is officially sanctioned and operated under the direct supervision of a legally recognized religious organization and obtain certification of said completion. Said course to be undertaken by an individual for the purpose of compliance with the definition of “Suitable Anger Management – Option C” by the acts and for the purposes of this chapters is not held to be worth credits or units of any kind. Completion of said course may be done through whatever means said course allows for, but must be completed by the individual held to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C.” By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter the following terms and/or questions must be met and/or addressed for a Anger Management course that is of a religious nature or that is being used to obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C” for said course to be considered compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter:

(1a) The curriculum must not teach that one religion or religious teaching is superior in any way to any other specific religion/s and/or beliefs and/or the lack thereof religious faith, to do so shall with regards to this chapter completely nullify the curriculum. It is however permitted to teach that one specific religion or religious teaching is generically good as long doing so can be done in such a manner that other specific religion/s and/or beliefs and/or the lack thereof religious faith are not taught to be generically bad or inferior. The aforementioned statement is only with regards to the curriculum of said Anger Management program, and does not interfere with other proceedings.

(1e) The curriculum must not teach religion based discrimination or discrimination of any kind to do so shall with regards to this chapter completely nullify the curriculum. The aforementioned statement is only with regards to the curriculum of said Anger Management program, and does not interfere with other proceedings.

(2) By the acts and for purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C”:

(2a) By the Acts and for the purposes of this chapter the physical proof of completion that is created for an individual who completes an Anger Management course for purpose of compliance with sub-section 1 of subsection r of section 5 must be kept and protected by said individual.

(2b) “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option C” if it is held to be completed must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(s) “Additional Anger Management Training” means:

(1) An individual who is held to obtain “Additional Anger Management Training” must meet the following terms and conditions for it to be said that they have obtained “Additional Anger Management Training”:

(1a) A minimum of 10 hours of billable time spent with a licensed psychologist. During which every detail of the orders, directions, and suggestions of said involved licensed psychologist by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter are to be explicitly followed and considered to be legally binding, unless said orders, directions, and suggestions are incongruous with the law.

(1b) Failing to follow every detail of the orders, directions, and suggestions of said involved licensed psychologist during aforementioned minimum of 10 hours of billable time results in none of the billable hours with said involved licensed psychologist to count as being compliant towards the acts of this chapter.

(1c) In this aforementioned instance an individual who is being held to obtain “Additional Anger Management Training” must obtain a minimum of 10 hours of billable time with a different individual who is a licensed psychologist and for which said billable time is compliant with the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(2) Any and all governmental bodies of the State of Georgia, and/or The American Medical Association, and/or The American Psychological Association may supply and mandate additional requirements for an individual who is held to obtain “Additional Anger Management Training”.

(t) “Terms To Be Met As A Portion Of The Definition Of: “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” And/ Or “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” means:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter the following terms must be met as a portion of the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training” and/or “Suitable Anger Management Training”:

(1a) Said aforementioned handwritten document generated by and for compliance with subsection 1 of subsection i of section 5; And/or said aforementioned handwritten document generated by and for compliance with subsection 1 of subsection o of section 5, said aforementioned documents must be shown to one person, other than oneself, who is capable of providing legal witness, this person must sign, date and provided printed full legal name, as it exists on a form Georgia State issued identification, at the bottom of said document. All parties involved must receive a copy of said document. The same individual may serve as witness to both of aforementioned documents.

(1b) Said aforementioned documents are permitted to be kept private if and only if doubt of said document’s existences should fail to arise.

(1c) In the event that doubt of either or both of said document’s existences should arise all involved individuals and comprehensively yet non-exclusively including any other persons who served as legal witness may provide public oral testimony. Testimony must detail to the document’s existence under threat of legal consequence for false testimony. Testimony given must be suitable to alleviate doubt of said document’s existence beyond a shadow of doubt for all in attendance, or other means to alleviate doubt as detailed in this chapter must be taken.

(1d) Alternatively, in the event that doubt of either or both of said document’s existences should arise and/or testimony as it is aforementioned in subsection 1c of subsection t of section 5 is unsatisfactory, the original copy of said document may be produced with the signatures and only the signatures on said document covered up.

(1e) In the event that the original copy of either or both of said documents cannot be produced as evidence of it’s own existence, and one and/or both and/or all parties involved are unwilling to provide public testimony one of the parties involved must produce a copy of said document.

(1f) In the event that a copy of either or both of said documents cannot be produced by one of the parties involved, each of said individuals must make a public oral apology to the individual or individuals who were involved in the situation which caused doubt to be raised. And, within 24 hours, a handwritten re-creation of the original document must be made, with the printed name of the original witness. If the original witness is unwilling to provide legal witness a second time, a different individual who is capable of providing legal witness may provide legal witness. If a different individual provides legal witness they must do so in front of a public notary, and the document must be notarized.

(1g) In the event of any of said witnesses being unwilling to testify to the documents authenticity, said witnesses may be held subject to legal summons and/or be judicially ordered to provide testimony.

(1h) In the event that one or any parties involved are unable to provide testimony, decisions to proceed with actions and potential criminal filings by the acts of this chapter are to be considered well within the powers of any and all governmental bodies of the State of Georgia, and/or The American Medical Association (AMA) and/or The American Psychological Association (APA).

(1i) Doubt as to the authenticity either or of said documents may be raised through any means, and if doubt is raised it is not to be revocable. For the sake of example: any persons who by the acts of this chapter fits the definition of “Patient” as defined by the acts of this chapter may simply orally and/or in writing ask; “Do you have crisis management training?” and/or “Do you have anger management training?” and/or any phrase or phrasing to the like.

(1j) In the event that the act of “handwriting” any of said documents which must be generated for compliance with this chapter to meet the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” And/ Or “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” is to difficult, impossible or simply undesired. Said individual may instead of writing by hand read aloud and/or dictated at a sufficient volume and record on video said activity and make it available for the world to see on the internet, via websites such as www.youtube.com, it is permissible that the video exists in multiple parts. Said video must be publicly available. Said individual must be easily identifiable in said video. The vocalizations of the words being read aloud and/or dictated must be easily recognizable. Additional words may be added to the contents of said video, but no words may be omitted, every word that would otherwise be “handwritten” must be clearly read and or dictated aloud.

(1k) In the event that the act of “handwriting” and/or “reading aloud and/or dictating at a sufficient volume” any of said documents which must be generated for compliance with this chapter to meet the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” And/ Or “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A”is to difficult, impossible or simply undesired. Said individual may instead record a video of them re-typing the contents that would otherwise be handwritten said activity must be made available for the world to see on the internet, via websites such as www.youtube.com, it is permissible that the video exists in multiple parts. Said video must be publicly available. Said individual must be easily identifiable in said video. The act of typing is to be easily recognizable as being preformed by said individual. Additional words may be added to the contents of said video, but no words may be omitted, every word that would otherwise be “handwritten” must be clearly typed.

(1l) “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A” and/or “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” if it is held to be completed must be completed once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example a new hire.

(u) “Treatment Plan” means:

(1) A schedule of procedures and/or appointments designed to restore, step-by-step, a Patient’s health. The plan includes advantages, disadvantages, alternatives, and sequelae of treatment. Whenever a Patient is legally capable of consenting the Patient’s consent is needed for approval.

Section 6, Obligations of the Health Care Provider:

(1) The Health Care Provider, must have on display a Visible Symbol of American Patriotism in every room that has a capacity of 10 or more persons, as determined by building design and/or functionality and/or fire codes. The display must be sizable enough to be clearly visible to at least half the persons in said rooms. If a single Visible Symbol of American Patriotism is not adequate to display a Visible Symbol of American Patriotism to at least half the persons in said rooms, multiple Visible Symbols of American Patriotism must be displayed. Health Care Providers that are an establishment composed of multiple individuals are exempt from the acts of sub-section 4 of sub-section g of section 5 as it would be impractical for an establishment to identify itself as an individual “Voter” as the subsection defines.

(2) If The Health Care Provider employs a Medical Professional who violates the acts of this chapter. The Health Care Provider is required to provide a term of probationary employment of no less then 2 weeks, and no more then 6 weeks. During the period of probationary employment, the employee may be terminated for any reason.

(3) If by the end of the period of probationary employment if the Medical Professional has not become or is not in the process of becoming congruent with the acts of this chapter, the Health Care Provider may terminate the employment of the Medical Professional.

(3a) If the Health Care Provider chooses not to terminate the employment of the Medical Professional, The Health Care Provider must extend an offer of unpaid leave and/or unpaid sabbatical and/or unpaid vacation of a period of no more then 90 days.

(3b) If at the end of 90 days of unpaid leave and/or unpaid sabbatical and/or unpaid vacation the Medical Professional has not become congruent with the acts of this chapter it shall be mandatory by the acts of this chapter that the Health Care Provider immediately terminate the employment of the Medical Professional. Any future payments or monies to the Medical Professional must not be paid, for when the Medical Professional violated the acts of this chapter and subsequently failed to become congruent with the acts of this chapter the Medical Professional relinquished claim on any and all payments or monies. And any stored vacation times or financial allowances of the Medical Professional must not be paid to the Medical Professional, for when the Medical Professional violated the acts of this chapter and subsequently failed to become congruent with the acts of this chapter the Medical Professional relinquished claim on any and all stored vacation times and financial allowances.

Section 7, Punitive actions that may be taken against the Health Care Provider who fails to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter:

(1) The local district attorney or district attorney’s office or anyone capable of using the full authority of the local district attorney’s office may file any and all charges he/she/they and/or his/her/their office deem lawful and appropriate. Any winnings of any court proceedings that result from this filing, shall be given to the State of Georgia for the express purpose of becoming financially solvent or maintaining financial solvency. For the purposes of elaboration the proceeding statement: Any winnings of any court proceedings that result from this filing, shall be given to the State of Georgia. The State of Georgia and judicial representation of the State of Georgia may also elect to reward monies to victims of Medical Professionals or Health Care Providers to be paid by said Medical Professionals and/or Health Care Providers.

(2) With or Without regard to the actions which rendered the involved Health Care Provider non-congruent with this chapter: Any and all Patients and/or Clients and/or Consumers and/or Business Associates and/or representatives of said parties which have a relation to the Health Care Provider that failed to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter may without threat of legal consequence from the Health Care Provider refuse payment for past or current goods and/or services, until the Health Care Provider becomes congruent with the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(3) The contents of section 7, of this chapter in no way nullify and/or redefine and/or abbreviate the acts of this chapter: And in no way does the acts of this chapter limit, and/or reduce, and/or nullify, and/or redefine, and/or abbreviate anyone’s ability to file law suit/s or press criminal charges against the offending Health Care Provider.

Section 8. Special rights of the Health Care Provider guaranteed by the acts of this chapter.

(1) The Health Care Provider may mandate that anyone in their employ, be held to obtain “Renewal of Suitable Crisis Management Training- Option A” as defined by the acts of this chapter, and/or may mandate that “Suitable Crisis Management Training” be repeated. The employee may select an option they previously completed and wish to repeat, or may select to complete a different option that meet’s the definition of “Suitable Crisis Management Training” as defined by the acts of this chapter, both events shall be considered of equal regard.

(2) The Health Care Provider may mandate that anyone in their employ, be held to obtain “Renewal of Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” as defined by the acts of this chapter, and/or may mandate that “Suitable Anger Management Training – Option A” or “Suitable Anger Management Training Option – B” or “Suitable Anger Management – Option C” be repeated. The employee may select an option they previously completed and wish to repeat, or may select to complete a different option of the aforementioned options, both events shall be considered of equal regard.

(3) The Health Care Provider may mandate that anyone in their employ, who has had formal complaints filed with said Health Care Provider from Patient/s as Patient is defined by the acts of this chapter be held to obtain “Additional Suitable Crisis Management Training” as defined by the acts of this chapter.

(4) The Health Care Provider may mandate that anyone in their employ, who has had formal complaints filed with said Health Care Provider from Patient/s as Patient is defined by the acts of this chapter be held to obtain “Additional Suitable Anger Management Training” as defined by the acts of this chapter.

Section 9, Obligations of the Medical Professional:

(1) The Medical Professional must at all times by the acts of this chapter be displaying on their persons at least one Visible Symbol of American Patriotism, regardless of personal beliefs.

(2) The Medical Professional must take a Hippocratic Style Oath as it is defined by the acts of this chapter at least once a year: At least once a year in front of two individuals who are capable of providing legal witness, the Medical Professional must orally recite said oath at volume the witnesses deem suitable.

(2a) At the time of recital the Medical Professional is to have a handwritten copy of said oath recited, that is written in the Medical Professional’s handwriting. The two individuals who provide legal witness to the recital of the oath must sign and date and print their full legal names at the bottom of the handwritten copy of aforementioned oath that is written in the Medical Professional’s handwriting. The Medical Professional must also sign and date said oath.

(2b) This document which contains the handwritten copy of said oath and display of the signatures of two legal witnesses and the Medical Professional is to be freely shared with the public, upon request of anyone.

(3) The Medical Professional must obtain “Suitable Crisis Management Training” as “Suitable Crisis Management Training” is defined by the acts of this chapter. The acts of this chapter in no way nullify and/or redefine and/or abbreviate any requirements placed upon the Medical Professional to obtain crisis management training by anybody including but not limited to: The State of Georgia, and/or The Medical Professional’s Employer and/or The American Medical Association (AMA) and/or The American Psychological Association (APA).

(4) The Medical Professional must obtain “Suitable Anger Management Training” as “Suitable Anger Management Training” is defined by the acts of this chapter. The acts of this chapter in no way nullify and/or redefine and/or abbreviate any requirements placed upon the Medical Professional to obtain anger management training by anybody including but not limited to: The State of Georgia, and/or The Medical Professional’s Employer and/or The American Medical Association (AMA) and/or The American Psychological Association (APA).

Section 10, Obligations of Medical Professionals with regard to Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) training:

(1) All Medical Professionals as defined by this chapter shall by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, be held to obtain CPR training, and receive certification that they have obtained said training. Said training and certification must be officially recognized by the American Heart Association (AHA).

(2) All Medical Professionals as defined by this chapter shall by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, be held to maintain certification in CPR training. Said training and certification must be officially recognized by the AHA.

(3) Said CPR Training Certification is to be considered public, and in no way or fashion may be hidden or obscured from anyone. A copy of this document must at all times be readily available, and promptly presented to anyone who requests to examine it. If this cannot be done said Medical Professional must within one week’s time obtain a CPR training certification that is officially recognized by the AHA.

(4) CPR Training must be completed and certification of said completion must be obtained once by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, by the 13th of October in the year of this chapter’s date of effect as detailed in section 15 of this chapter: And/Or within 30 days of this chapter’s date of effect, whichever is the sooner date by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter must be held; Or in the case of individuals who newly meet the definition of “Medical Professional” within 30 days of the activity that defined them as a “Medical Professional”: for the sake of example: a new hire.

(5) CPR training must by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter be maintained, and the 13th of October in every year following this chapter’s date of effect shall be considered an absolute deadline of said maintenance. If on the 13th of October in any given year after this chapter’s date of effect, one who is defined by this chapter as a Medical Professional, is not currently CPR certified; they are by the acts of this chapter, not permitted to be employed, receive monies, volunteer, or act in any fashion that relates to medicine and/or health and/or do anything that would allow them to be defined as a Medical Professional by this chapter.

Section 11, Special Obligations of Medical Professionals with Patients Undergoing Treatments:

(1) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, all Medical Professionals who interact with an individual in such a manner that said individual is a Patient of theirs; and that Patient is currently or will be undergoing treatment from said Medical Professional; said Medical Professional must, if they are qualified to do so, develop or be part of the development of or, know of a Treatment Plan as Treatment Plan is defined by this chapter; that is relevant to current circumstances for said patient. Said Treatment Plan must be akin in nature to the Treatment Plans that are currently used amongst Oncologist for cancer patients. Said Treatment Plan must be memorized by said Medical Professional or written down, to allow for discussion of treatment options with said patient.

(2) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, said treatment plan as it is aforementioned in subsection 1 of section 11 of this chapter, must be at the patient’s verbal or written request clearly explained in simple language to the patient. The task of explaining the Treatment Plan may be performed by anyone with knowledge of said Treatment Plan.

(3) By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, the responsibility of a patient’s Treatment Plan existing and being used falls on all Medical Professionals who have contact or association with the Patient. As such any individual who is privy to handle a Patient’s confidential information be it of a medical nature or otherwise, and happens to encounter a Patients Treatment Plan, by mere handling has shown a conscientious nature to the details of said Treatment Plan thus sharing a co-liability. Any Health Care Provider associated with the Medical Professional/s involved with the Treatment Plan and/or the Patient/s who are involved with the Treatment Plan shares a co-liability for the Treatment Plan’s content.

(4) Whenever it is practical a Treatment Plan’s content must be followed.

(5) Whenever a current Treatment Plan is unavailable, a new and temporary Treatment Plan must be made. This temporary Treatment Plan must be followed for as long as it is practical. In the event of emergencies, this temporary Treatment Plan need not be detailed until emanate danger has passed. Once emanate danger has passed the details of said temporary Treatment Plan must be readily communicable; and a non-temporary Treatment Plan must be made.

(6) Whenever possible the actions of a Treatment Plan shall be practiced before implementation of said actions using theatrical style acting, counseling techniques, or other techniques that allow for a practice session that does not put the Patient’s life or livelihood in danger. This shall be done in effort to improve the Treatment Plan, or improve the Treatment Plan’s effectiveness. \

(7) Any and all Treatment Plans or documents, or dictations, or explanatory speeches which could be considered to have the nature of a Treatment Plan or be part of a Treatment Plan, should be considered a live document, and the contents should be changed as new information becomes available.

Section 12, Special Obligations of Medical Professionals Who Do Or May Have Direct Contact With Pregnant Patients: By the acts and for the purposes of this chapter:

(1) The personhood of the mother is to be respected. Terminologies and language that personally make the mother most comfortable are to be used, if the Medical Professional is unsure of what terminologies and languages to use they must ask the mother. Unless it makes the mother uncomfortable, the Medical Professional must address the mother by some respectful variation of the mother’s legal name, and do so with each physical interaction with said Patient. Unless it makes the mother uncomfortable, the Medical Professional must refer to the fetus by the name given to the fetus or a title that shows association to the mother and do so with each interaction with said Patient. The mother can provide in writing or verbally dictate her wishes to become part of her medical record on file.

(2) The personhood of the fetus is to be respected and the terminology “fetus” is not permitted to be verbally used by any Medical Professional in front of any pregnant persons. If the message the Medical Professional desires to articulate to a pregnant individual must include the word “fetus” the message must be written down in the patient’s native language and handed to the Patient. If the Patient is illiterate another person other than the Medical Professional must act as a translator/interpreter. At the direct request of the mother the term “fetus” may be used.

(3) More than one Treatment Plan or a multifaceted Treatment Plan must exist, and all Medical Professionals who are privy to medical information and have or may have direct contact with the pregnant Patient for whom said multiple/multifaceted Treatment Plan/s exist, must as a means to reduce risk to the mother and fetus: have a copy or a general knowledge of the multiple/multifaceted Treatment Plans.

(4) Of the multiple/multifaceted Treatment Plan/s that must exist for pregnant Patients by the acts and for the purposes of this chapter, said Treatment Plan/s must as fully as possible address the topic of labor: What should be done if the patient went into labor in the very near future? What should be done if said labor is abnormal? Under what circumstances the patient’s labor should be stopped, and through what means? Under what circumstances the patient should be offered surgery/ surgeries, why should they be offered said surgery/ surgeries and what kind of surgery should be done? What preparatory procedures or medicines should be given? These questions, and any questions the mother and father have must be addressed by said Treatment Plan/s. These questions, and any questions the Medical Professional/s that are personally involved have must be addressed by said Treatment Plan/s.

Section 13, Punitive actions that may be taken against the Medical Professional who fails to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter:

(1) The local district attorney or district attorney’s office or anyone capable of using the full authority of the local district attorney’s office may file any and all charges he/she/they and/or his/her/their office deem lawful and appropriate. Any winnings of any court proceedings that result from this filing, shall be given to the State of Georgia for the express purpose of becoming financially solvent or maintaining financial solvency. For the purposes of elaboration the proceeding statement: Any winnings of any court proceedings that result from this filing, shall be given to the State of Georgia. The State of Georgia and judicial representation of the State of Georgia may also elect to reward monies to victims of Medical Professionals or Health Care Providers to be paid by said Medical Professionals and/or Health Care Providers.

(2) Any and all Patients and/or Clients and/or Consumers and/or Business Associates and/or representatives of said parties which have a relation to the Medical Professional that failed to remain congruent with the acts of this chapter may without threat of legal consequence from the Medical Professional refuse payment for past or current goods and/or services, until the Medical Professional becomes congruent with the acts and purposes of this chapter.

(3) The contents of the following statement in no way nullify and/or redefine and/or abbreviate the acts of this chapter: And in no way does the acts of this chapter limit, and/or reduce, and/or nullify, and/or redefine, and/or abbreviate anyone’s ability to file law suit or press criminal charges against the offending Medical Professional.

Section 14, Addenda and appendixes:

(1) Addendum 1, The Classical Version of the Hippocratic Oath as translated from Greek by Ludwig Edelstein:

I swear by Apollo Physician and Asclepius and Hygieia and Panaceia and all the gods and goddesses, making them my witnesses, that I will fulfill according to my ability and judgment this oath and this covenant:

To hold him who has taught me this art as equal to my parents and to live my life in partnership with him, and if he is in need of money to give him a share of mine, and to regard his offspring as equal to my brothers in male lineage and to teach them this art – if they desire to learn it – without fee and covenant; to give a share of precepts and oral instruction and all the other learning to my sons and to the sons of him who has instructed me and to pupils who have signed the covenant and have taken an oath according to the medical law, but no one else.

I will apply dietetic measures for the benefit of the sick according to my ability and judgment; I will keep them from harm and injustice.

I will neither give a deadly drug to anybody who asked for it, nor will I make suggestion to this effect. Similarly I will not give to a woman an abortive remedy. In purity and holiness I will guard my life and my art.

I will not use the knife, not even on sufferers from stone, but will withdraw in favor of such men as are engaged in this work.

Whatever houses I may visit, I will come for the benefit of the sick, remaining free of all intentional injustice, of all mischief and in particular of sexual relations with both female and male persons, be they free or slaves.

What I may see or hear in the course of the treatment or even outside of the treatment in regard to the life of men, which on no account one must spread abroad, I will keep to myself, holding such things shameful to be spoken about.

If I fulfill this oath and do not violate it, may it be granted to me to enjoy life and art, being honored with fame among all men for all time to come; if I transgress it and swear falsely, may the opposite of all of this be my lot.

(2) Addendum 2, A Modern Version of the Hippocratic Oath as written by Louis Lasagna in 1964:

I swear to fulfill, to the best of my ability and judgment, this covenant:

I will respect the hard-won scientific gains of those physicians in whose steps I walk, and gladly share such knowledge as is mine with those who are to follow.

I will apply, for the benefit of the sick, all measures [that] are required, avoiding those twin traps of overtreatment and therapeutic nihilism.

I will remember that there is art to medicine as well as science, and that warmth, sympathy, and understanding may outweigh the surgeon’s knife or the chemist’s drug.

I will not be ashamed to say “I know not,” nor will I fail to call in my colleagues when the skills of another are needed for a patient’s recovery.

I will respect the privacy of my patients, for their problems are not disclosed to me that the world may know. Most especially must I tread with care in matters of life and death. If it is given me to save a life, all thanks. But it may also be within my power to take life; this awesome responsibility must be faced with great humbleness and awareness of my own frailty. Above all, I must not play at God.

I will remember that I do not treat a fever chart, a cancerous growth, but a sick human being, whose illness may affect the person’s family and economic stability. My responsibility includes these related problems, if I am to care adequately for the sick.

I will prevent disease whenever I can, for prevention is preferable to cure.

I will remember that I remain a member of society, with special obligations to all my fellow human beings, those sound of mind and body as well as the infirm.

If I do not violate this oath, may I enjoy life and art, respected while I live and remembered with affection thereafter. May I always act so as to preserve the finest traditions of my calling and may I long experience the joy of healing those who seek my help.

(3) Addendum 3, “Suitable Crisis Management Training – Option A”:

Most crisis situations that can happen have happened before and when a similar crisis happens again knowledge of past similar crisis situations is extraordinarily valuable. Being unprepared is no excuse; being unprepared for a crisis is a reflection of the importance you place in life, death, and livelihood. “Be Prepared” is an excellent motto. Even if the crisis at hand is not notably similar to crisis situations of the past which one has knowledge of, that knowledge of past crisis situations can be remarkably valuable. While natural instinct is valuable; improvisation and judgment are greatly honed through training. Often simply knowing and having a basic faith that crisis situations have happened in the past and many of them were overcome, is a powerful piece of knowledge and faith. It is best to plan how to respond to a crisis before it happens. What materials can be prepared beforehand? Basic information and background information is nearly always available beforehand. But this needs not to be dwelled on, because often information that is most prudent to the situation is readily available during the situation. The person who devotes time towards training for and orientating themselves with common and uncommon crisis situations they may encounter in their line of work, is more prepared then they would have been otherwise.

It is often possible to prepare a physical checklist or at very least a mental checklist. A generic checklist can be helpful as well: 1. Who should be involved? Who needs to be alerted? Who’s presence is not required and should be asked to leave? Who should be called upon to assist? 2. If possible gather the five “W’s” and the tag-a-long “H”: Who? What? When? Where? Why? and How? but do not dwell on these. 3. Confirm facts and verify technical information. 4. Obtain control of own emotions before taking actions. 5. Work with regard to facts and record as much as possible if time permits. 6. Understand your distinct role in the group handling the crisis, and if possible allow the others to fulfill their distinct roles. 7. Try not to coerce members of the group handling the crisis to participate if they are visibly and/or obviously not in control of their emotions. 8. During times of crisis always work towards public service, general benevolence, and humanitarian objectives. 9. During times of crisis, allow for flexibility and outright disregard for set procedures as set procedures may not be a best-fit solution for a crisis situation. 10. Use language and communication that everyone involved is likely to understand.

Proper crisis communication enables quicker response and clearer thinking. Crisis communication should focus on using easily understood language and on the gathering of all critical information into one location. Gathering as much information as possible before a crisis saves valuable time. Crisis communication should be planned: Who should speak and who should not? What goals must be materialized? Who should be involved in a given process and who should not? Who needs to know the information involved and who can or should be left uninformed? Should the top person of authority or most credentialed person act as the representative and be the one who leads the situation, the answer: not necessarily. The person leading the crisis situation needs to be calm regardless of other attributes, the ability to remain calm is paramount. The person who is communicating in the crisis situation needs to understand human beings communicate in many different ways: choice of words, speech cadence, body position and language, facial expression and attitude. The person who is communicating in the crisis must keep the message calm, humane, factual, and current; and they must keep those who need to be informed as well informed as is necessary, they must remain physically, mentally and emotionally available during the crisis.

One crisis situation that many people from all walks of life will be a victim of is: Heart Attacks. Heart Attacks are a great example of the potential life saving impact of crisis management. It helps those who are studying Crisis Management to think of such examples.

Over one million people in the United States have a heart attack each year. Knowing what to do in the event that person is having a heart attack could save a life. Delay of treatment when a heart attack happens can be deadly. It is important to learn the warning signs of a heart attack. According to The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, and The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “…. the single most important thing you can do to save a life: call 9-1-1 immediately for emergency medical care…” They also state : “Of the people who die from heart attacks, about half die within an hour of their first symptoms and before they reach the hospital.”

This shows that proper crisis management starts with being prepared and having as much knowledge as possible. Certain major risk factors for heart attacks people can have some control over such as: Lack of physical activity, an unhealthy diet, smoking, obesity, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and diabetes. Other risk factors can’t be controlled at all like: family history of heart attacks, and aging; but these risk factors should be known. The symptoms of a heart attack should be discussed with a trusted Cardiologist. The symptoms of a heart attack can vary from person to person and it must be stressed that if you even think you might be having a heart attack you must call 9-1-1. The most common symptom for both men and women is chest pain or discomfort. But heart attacks can start slowly and show only mild symptoms, and for people who have high blood sugar, may show no symptoms or extraordinarily mild ones. Other possible symptoms include but are not limited too: upper body discomfort, shortness of breath, breaking out in a cold sweat, feeling unusually tired, nausea, vomiting, light-headedness or sudden dizziness, any sudden new symptoms or symptom patterns.

Acting fast is top priority. It is astonishingly shameful and terribly sad, but according to The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute, and The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services: “those who arrive to a hospital by ambulance often receive faster treatment at the hospital.” This coupled with the fact that EMT’s can begin life saving procedures immediately and can respond if your heart stops beating, make traveling to the hospital by ambulance, in the event of a potential heart attack, the best way to get to the hospital. The 9-1-1 operator should be able to give you advice. The 9-1-1 operator should know things like: Asprin, if one is not allergic, taken during a heart attack can limit damage to the heart and save your life. That being said never delay in calling 9-1-1 to take Asprin or do anything else. You should know and ask your doctor about whether you can or should take Asprin in the event of a heart attack. If your doctor tells you that you are at high risk, consider taking part in a clinical trial or other medical research.

Certain information should be written down and kept with you at all times: any medications you are taking, any medications you are allergic too, and important phone numbers including your doctor’s and the person who should be contacted in case you go to the hospital.

If any error during, after or because of a crisis creates victims: A committed and compassionate investigation must begin immediately; to help prevent a repetition of the same or similar errors.

Remember to care.

(4) Addendum 4, “Suitable Anger Management Training Option – A”:

Anger Management tips are as old as time, they are tested, tried and true. But not every tip is going to work for every person. It is important if you are to get control of your anger that you understand which of these tips help extinguish and which of these tips only fuel the fire of your anger. Your anger is a destructive emotion, much more often then not. While it is possible to use anger as a motivation to do good things, anger generated in a moment is NEVER positive. You will never fix anything with anger, when you act with anger you are always wrong. Ready for the first tip?

Notice that while the above paragraph was read/wrote the pronoun “you” or “your” was used. Was it noticeable how the pronoun “you” can have a negative effect on a message? If the negative effect was not noticeable to the reader with the first time through the paragraph, it will be noticeable now. The above paragraph with all of it’s “you” statements is meant to be slightly inflammatory it is meant to put the reader into a defensive mindset. If during the first time through the above “you” statement paragraph “you” got even slightly noticeably angry, bad news, this is strong evidence of a sever anger management problem. Now worse news, even if the reader just thought something like “this is worded in a very accusatory manner,” thoughts like this are evidence of a mild anger management problem. Now for the worse news yet, even if the “you” statement paragraph had no effect on the reader, there is still a 100% chance that anger is a problem and a personal burden. For this last group of even tempered people it must be remembered: even if one never becomes personally angry in such a manner that hurts performance, the anger of others is still a burden. So here comes the lesson from these two paragraphs “I” is the most powerful word in the English language, and is the most powerful concept in all of language. And “you” can be a dangerous word, and “you” statements is most certainly a dangerous concept.

That last group of even tempered people, should be apologized to but it is important to understand that if the actions of co-workers can be tainted by anger, the performance of the group can be tainted by anger, thus introducing a co-liability.

Remember to care and have compassion towards yourself and others, compassion is step one.

I” when used properly, has a unburdening effect: “You need to tell me what’s going on” versus “I need to know what’s going on.” Both statements articulate the same message, but one is worded much better then the other because of our friend, the letter/word “I.” The first statement could easily be misinterpreted by the person receiving the message, “You need to tell me what’s going on” can easily sound like “I blame you for what’s going on.” The power of “I” needs to be fully understood, because it can be used for good and mischief. The second statement: “I need to know what’s going on;” is harder to misinterpret and if it is misinterpreted it is likely to be in a positive manner. The person receiving the message “I need to know what’s going on” could very well feel like the person speaking this message is actually saying “I need to know what’s going on, because I am here to help” or “I need to know what’s going on, we can do this together.” Proper use of “I” statements help people communicate without placing blame or criticizing. All people should practice using “I” statements in non-emergency situations because: properly using “I” statements could save the day in an emergency situation. Both “felt” messages from “I need to know what’s going on” and other possible “felt” messages have an unburdening effect, which could save the day. Use “I” statements.

There are some things that can be done before an event that might induce anger, emergency situations often induce anger, to lessen the possibility that anger is induced, or at very least reduce the anger that is felt: 1. Staying in reasonably good health helps tremendously, focusing on endurance capabilities. It is not fully understood as to why this, and many very fit people have anger issues, all the same it is good to stay healthy anyway. 2. Practice relaxation skills, many things can be used to relax a person, know what individually works and knowing what works for others can help too. 3. Laugh everyday. 4. Practice communication and practical skills that will be needed in an emergency/ anger incidence including: Quickly forgiving, asking for help, looking for possible solutions, and calmly expressing one’s self. 5. Take time for one’s self everyday, even if only a few seconds can be squeezed in; for the sake of example:

Coffee drinkers should always let that first sip of coffee really be theirs: Hold the cup with both hands feeling the temperature of the coffee inside; close your eyes and smell the coffee, now imagine the taste of it, imagine how it is going to make you feel just a bit better, know that it will comfort you just enough to face the day, know that somewhere in that coffee cup is a perfect sip of coffee, it is probably the first sip but it may not be, either way that comfort is coming very soon; then and only then take a sip.

There are things that can be done during an event that might induce anger, an example event would be most emergencies; to lessen the possibility that anger is induced, or at very least reduce the anger that is felt: 1. Use “I” statements. 2. Think before you speak or act, remember: “pause, think, speak” or “pause, think, act.” 3. Take a time out if you really need one, you may not be able to take much time but you might be able to take the time to count backwards from “10.” 4. Identify and focus on solutions. 5. Know one’s limitations, and the limitations of those around one’s self, it is often a good idea to seek additional help.

There are things that can be done after a damaging event which induced anger to prevent a similar future event: 1. Take part in ensuring the immediate termination of any staff that visibly lost there temper, even if that staff is oneself. 2. Don’t be unforgiving, while it might be necessary for legal reasons to keep thoughts of forgiveness silent; one should let themselves experience thoughts of forgiveness at very least in private. 3. Investigate what went wrong and what solutions could be used in the future. 4. Get some exercise, there is truth to the old phrase: “walk it off.” 5. Consider counseling, there is no shame in seeking psychological help.

Anger occurs when vulnerability and/or threat is perceived, and as feelings of vulnerability increase so will feelings of threat. Anger is a defensive mechanism used to combat threat and vulnerability. Unfortunately this generates a natural self-reinforcement and the more anger experienced the more vulnerability felt. Sadly anger can make a person feel like it imparts strength when in reality it makes every aspect to a person weaker and less capable. And perhaps sadder it is easy to fall into a self-defeating cycle of using anger as a defensive mechanism and thus requiring higher levels of it next time a threat is perceived. A point can be reached where a burden of a near constant generalized resentment towards is created, an always angry. If one reaches this point, hope and prayer that no one reading this ever does: They need to seek professional help. For anger management techniques, if remembered, can help with escalation of anger and can even prevent anger, but anger management techniques do little to help with chronic resentment, always anger. If one becomes chronically resentful that person should seek professional help.

Typical daily anger is not due to threats to the physical body it is due to ego-threat, as in threats that make a person fell loss or threat towards the loss of self-value. The more entitled a person feels, the greater the threat, the greater the resentment and anger. Most people with chronic anger problems have problems with entitlement and ego. Indeed most anger most people feel is generated from problems with entitlement and ego.

A little introspection and it can be realized that anger as it is normally defined is missing something, because people can and have responded positively to threats even threats that made the person feel vulnerable and hurt their self-worth and ego. Perhaps it is possible to respond to these potential anger inducing situations because they were not mentally classifiable as “major.” But it is more likely that people are able to respond well because they did not feel blamed. Most people would not get angry or would not get very angry if they were told “I feel you have health issues.” More people would get angry if they were told “You have health issues.” A lot of people would get angry if they were told they are “like that” and it’s their fault, because they don’t eat right, don’t exercise, and don’t listen to any of the sound medical advice they are given because they are stupid. It does not take much ability with introspection to see as a sense of blame increases the likely-hood of anger increases. For many just knowing this will be powerful, and help prevent anger from escalating. For others this correlation of anger with blame will be as easily forgotten as anger management tips and anger will escalate anyway, these people need reconditioning.

Again many of you should be apologized to because many of you are not going to need this, or in this case really need to know about this, but please imagine: what if one of your colleagues is fighting a secret and silent battle with anger. To those that feel they don’t need this and don’t feel it’s is even possible a colleague could be fighting a secret and silent battle with anger, reconditioning and professional help may be needed. By the time that we know that we are angry, we are ready to devalue someone as a means to re-inflate our own value. This like most of the habitual natures to anger is dangerous. This devaluing of others coupled with the solid inarguable fact that while in emotional states we are not likely to recall what we learned in calm learning states, makes an angry person a dangerous basically useless person. Anger is dangerous and that must not be forgotten.

Classical conditioning is a good way to avoid the devaluing effect of anger, and can even be used to help us remember what we learned in calm learning states.

We have talked about psychological aspects to anger without touching on the physiological aspects to anger. The Fight-or-Flight Response is the main physiological response that I will be discussing. With training, the best we can do is have a short period of Fight-or-Flight followed by a regaining of control, this is because the neurological response to stimuli is processed in two ways simultaneously. The first neurological pathway is faster, and directly through what is known as our “reptile brain” the amygdala it is: Stimulus to Thalamus to Amygdala to Hypothalamus. This first pathway turns on the Fight-or-Flight Response and it is faster then the second pathway.

Because knowledge is power:

The Fight-or-Flight response grossly summarized: the hypothalamus activates two systems sympathetic nervous, and adrenal-cortical. The sympathetic nervous system uses nerve pathways to initiate reactions in the body, and the adrenal-cortical uses the blood stream. The sympathetic nervous system sends out impulses to the entire body including the adrenal medulla, which in turn releases adrenaline and noradrenaline. Many other hormones are involved as well. The Fight-or-Flight response can create a physiological environment which is not suited for anything but fleeing for or fighting for one’s life, for all other tasks including trying to save someone else’s life if one is in Fight-or-Flight one is near useless for.

The second slower pathway is the deciding pathway and it has the power to turn off or leave on the Fight-or-Flight response. The second pathway is Stimulus to Thalamus to Sensory Cortex to Hippocampus to Amygdala to Hypothalamus. This existence of two separate neurological pathways is why regardless of how big or brave, a burly man is; he may jump and may even squeal a little when he is watching a horror movie and there is a pop-out scene. Laugh everyday, remember?

Everyday anger typically has nothing to do with fear for one’s own life or fear of danger for one’s body, Everyday anger typically is about fear for ego’s sake. It sucks, but that is how it is, yes people are capable of being afraid and angry for the sake of others but even in these instances more often then not this empathy is personalized to an individual’s own ego’s constructs and constraints.

Classical conditioning is again a good way to avoid an aspect of anger, classical conditioning can help anyone avoid the fears of anger. Strictly speaking the fears will not be avoided or erased; the fears will be overridden and will still exist, but the idea is to override this fear with new memory and actions.

The fear associated with anger is mostly about the fear of loss of self-value and a threat to ego. So lets approach what to do about this:

Firstly it does not really matter why one is afraid for one’s ego or why one’s ego feels threatened, this fear is not helping. This does need to be personally figured out, and one should NEVER attempt to figure it out in the moment. Rightly coming to this realization will take away some the fear’s power and help one overcome it. Once and if this fear for one’s ego is ever overcome, it’s existence can be pondered then, but chances are one won’t care or want to.

Secondly learn about one’s self and slowly-progressively train one’s self. Start small and work in steps which focus on manageability. Uncertainty is a huge component of all fears, fear of loss of ego shows an uncertainty to ego. While some uncertainty is healthy, uncertainty to the point where the ego is allowing debilitating anger to exist is unhealthy. Become fairly sure in one’s self.

Thirdly speak with and interact with people who have confidence in one’s self. We all should work towards instilling confidence in others, but also work towards them feeling confidence towards us. In an anger inducing situation where our ego-self is at so much risk, just being able to see someone who has confidence in us can remind us of the confidence we have in ourselves.

Fourthly stop trying to look at the immense challenge of facing one’s entire self and face the ego one step at a time. Talk about oneself with others. And never feel ashamed when contemplating seeking professional help.

Fifthly play positivity orientated mind games with one’s self. Fight-or-Flight is triggered by real danger’s to one’s body, perceived danger’s to one’s body as well as real and perceived danger’s to one’s ego. But it can also be triggered by any number of non-anger related personal emotional things, it is these emotional triggers that should be focus of one’s positivity orientated mind games.

Let’s play the “Free Hugs Mind Game”:

(Games similar to this have existed for a long time in counseling practices, but as far as the author knows this one is his own creation, he has looked for a previously existing “Free Hugs Mind Game” and has not found evidence of such. The Free Hugs Campaign was the inspiration for this idea.)

Perhaps you are familiar with the concept of free hugs, it is hugging a friend or a stranger and no one makes any money. It is doubtful that there is a beginning to the concept of showing affection to a stranger, but there is a modern day story of the now famous Free Hugs Campaign started by Juan Mann. Well as it turns out “Free Hugs” was and in some places still is banned. This symbol of human hope was banned and a lot of realities were cited as reasoning, but none of them really hit the truth of the manner. At some level most of people are afraid of affection. For some people, they are so afraid of affection that they can not really hug a friend, maybe even find it difficult to hug those they love. Others are less afraid of affection and can freely hug friends, but may find it difficult to hug associates like co-workers. Others are even less afraid and are busy freaking most of the world out by being a “hugger” and freely and willingly hugging anyone who offers to hug them, and maybe even offering to hug others.

Chances are if you are a “Hugger” you don’t have anger management issues, but the “Free Hugs Mind Game” is still a good idea. It works like this: imagine a situation where you are hugging someone. If you are uncomfortable hugging loved ones: imagine hugging loved ones until you are comfortable imagining hugging loved ones. If you are uncomfortable hugging friends: imagine hugging friends, focus on building comfort. Work your way up to being comfortable imagining hugging strangers. Then imagine hugging enemies and get comfortable imagining hugging enemies. It may not be practical or safe in real life to hug one’s enemy, then again one day it might become a practical and safe part of the healing process with that particular enemy.

Caution should, of course, be practiced when showing or receiving affection; but caution is not the same thing as fear.

One should be cautious when learning anger management because there is “right” anger management techniques and there is “wrong” anger management techniques.

The anger management techniques that one should be cautious of focus on one of two things: expressing anger to “let it out” or desensitizing oneself to the triggers of anger. Note that none of the techniques outlined in the body of this work focus on or even touch-on either concept.

Never play “let it out” never do any techniques which focus on “letting it out” all of them are wrong, simply wrong. The old “hit a pillow” technique has been proven wrong so many times that it is shameful that it is still practiced. Don’t just Don’t “hit a pillow.” This makes it easier to hit and easier to express anger in general; and slowly this can make “letting it out” become so addictive that one begins to do so in everyday life. These techniques are dangerously wrong.

Never try to desensitize one’s self to “triggers” because to do so is to devalue them. Devaluation is one of the most dangerous aspects to anger. It is simply a bad idea to devalue the thing that triggers anger before it is devalued by the anger, because the thing that triggers anger has very real value. People need to hold onto and analyze the value of everything, if they are to come up with a real solution. The devaluation of triggers creates a dangerous reality, for the sake of example:

A bully makes fun of one of his or her peers day in and day out. Everyone around the child being made fun of will tell that child to devalue the jests of the bully so the child tries to do so. And eventually the child just ignores the jests of the bully but the child still hears them, still sees them, still knows about them, the child “swallows” these abuses and carries a terrible burden. Well this created one of two bad situations: the bully feels they must increase the torment or the child’s self-esteem gets so eroded that they become capable of personally justifying an act of violence. A possible third answer is still always going to be a sad one, and someone if not everyone who is involved is going to at very least have damaged self-esteems.

So lets focus again on what works. What works more then anything else is: compassion. Compassion is easy to remember and as such compassion is the only reliable way to diminish resentment, aka always anger. Thus compassion prevents any mistakes or abuses that stem from resentment, aka always anger. The techniques outlined in the body of this work are techniques based in compassion and placing value in human life.

In summation:

The techniques that can be done before an event that might induce anger focus on compassion towards one’s self. One should always have self-value, not to be confused with over-bloated ego.

The techniques that can be done during an event that might induce anger focus on compassion towards others who are involved. The people we see in front of us have value.

The techniques that can be done after a damaging event focus on compassion towards the greater good and what compassionate lessens can be learned. All people are valuable.

Remember to care.

Section 15. Date of Effect.

This chapter shall take effect upon it’s approval.

 

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